October 27, 2006

Carnival of Cinema

The Carnival of Cinema is up over here go and read it, there are plenty of good posts, including one from this blog.

LATER I should note that the comments below the fold have nothing to do with the Carnival of Cinema but are about Iran- an anonymous reader took issue with something I said on the Guardian blog about Iran, he provides some interesting links and I may have been wrong, I don't want to start a huge argument about Iran here but if you are interested in his links go and look at the comments.

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

Sorry, Off Topic:

I just read your post at Gaurdian regarding Khatami's reign of terror.

I must admit I envy your delusion.

Indeed Khatami was nothing more than a figurehead whose job was largely to lull the democratic opposition into a false sense of security. His legacy, more than anything else will be his callous indifference to repression and his attempt to legitimize a wholly illegitimate regime. He is descendant, part and parcel of 1400 years jockeying of power between State(monarchy) and Church. And in 1979, after 1400 years of struggle, the clergy elite strata of the Iranian society won the battle. All mullahs are the same. Mullahcrocy in Iran is a BUSINESS INDUSTRY and it has been so for centuries. I think Sir Menzies’ Judgement shows disrespect not only to the Iranian democratic movement and the enslaved poverty-ridden (According to CIA 40% live below poverty line and, I kid you not, according to the regime's figure, it's 70%) masses of Iranian people, but also to all those who strive for democracy and rule of law around the world.
For a review of Khatamis's reign of terror please read this post and all the informed comments to get a fair picture of what happened during his presidency:

http://hurryupharry.bloghouse.net/archives/2006/10/23/killer_khatami_gets_capped.php

To get an accurate panoramic picture of the Iran's Mullahs, its people and their mindset, read THE MULLAH CONSPIRACY, by Dr. Cyrus Doost—an Iranian-American psychologist. Although a novel, Professor Doost expertly details the actual workings of the Mullahcracy in a page-turner that enchants and informs the reader at the same time. Please read:

http://www.amilimani.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=40&Itemid=2

You will benefit from investing in buying a few factual books on Iranian history and the hijacking of Iranian revolution by the fascist and tyrannical mercenary mob of mullahs dispatched from Palestine by Mr. Arafat.

Apparently, you're utterly unaware of Iranian history and the previous regime's accomplishments in eradicating poverty, illiteracy, Rights of woman and so on. Shah created a middle class, which unbeknownst to him would later turn against him. Hence, mullah's systematic prevention of establishment a vibrant middle class despite unsurpassed and unheard of oil revenues in the country's entire history($300 million per day).

It would have been one thing if we had more social, political and economic freedom after the hijacking of the Revolution by Khomeini but that is not what happened. Ask Mrs. Christiana Ammanpour of CNN who lived in Iran for the first 21 year of her life in Iran how much freedom we had and how much of it we have lost.
Late Shah's achievements in Iran:

http://www.sedona.net/pahlavi/content.html

Under the mullah's the age of marriage was brought down from 18 to 9 years old. There are thousands of women who run away from their husband's home and they end up in the hands of prostitution rings.
Woman traficking in Iran is a state-run business venture run by the IRGC.

http://www.uri.edu/artsci/wms/hughes/iran_sex_slave_trade

http://www.uri.edu/artsci/wms/hughes/refs_iran.htm

http://www.iranfocus.com/modules/news/article.php?storyid=9001

...See Husband-killing on the rise in Iran. Also read the stories of some of these women here on the Amnesty International site.

Shahla Moazami, a criminologist in Iran, performed a conclusive research in 2003 on the topic of “spouse-killings”. These were her findings:
“From her interviews, Moazami found a clear and common pattern in the stories of the female killers. The women married young, often 12-14 years old, and they had from 5 to 7 children. At the time of the murder their average age was 29 years old. Many of them tell that their husband had lost interest in them, and they felt that their beauty was fading.

When a new man takes an interest in them, they fall easily for him. The law gives women few possibilities to get a divorce, and the murder of the husband is planned and done together with the new boyfriend. Only 33% of the women did the killing on their own. Moazami also found cases where women, sometimes with the assistance of their daughters, killed a violent husband.

Moazami thinks there are several structural causes to spouse killing. She mentions poverty, illiteracy, traditional opinions and Iranian women’s position in marriage and society. Young marriage age is also important. Moazami thinks that the women were too young to understand marriage when they married at 12-14 years old, and it was difficult for them make their own demands.” Source: Norwegian Information and Documentation Centre for Women's Studies and Gender Research.

Let’s tackle the first issue: marrying young. Who decides for a girl to marry young in the first place? Every one knows in traditionally male-dominated households, nothing takes place without the Father’s permission. So, the answer is a “Male”.
Who decides for women’s divorce? A male judge based on religious and patriarchal interpretations of family laws.
In 67% of the cases, who carries out the murder? A male lover.

Since illiteracy is indicated as one of the cultural triggers to spousal killing, in a traditionally male-dominated society, who decides when and why and how a young girl should go to school or if she needs to go to school at all? The Father; or any other empowered Male figure...more


http://www.iranian.com/LeilaFarjami/2006/October/Male/index.html

What Khomeini brought to IRAN:
http://www.homa.org/Details.asp?ContentID=2137352725&TOCID=2083225414

The holy crimes of this regime in terms of executions and human suffering and misery dwarfs anything the Pahlavi's did during their 53-year reign.

One out of 16 people in Iran is an addict. Iran has the highest rate of Heroin addicts--brought to us by the IRI--in the world. And this imbecile talks about SAVAK. (you only need to google and find the BBC article on that)

The ISLAMIC SAVAK, VEVAK (which, by the way, kept most Savak's opertives in it's employment intact), has outperformed Shah's SAVAK many folds over.

Frankly, the racist notion of "cultural relativism" is not only un-informed but it's very dangerous as this brilliant woman skillfully illustrates:

* In Germany, in August 1997, an 18-year-old woman was burnt to death by her father for refusing to marry the man he had chosen. A German court gave him a reduced sentence, saying he was practicing his culture and religion.

* In Iran, women and girls are forcibly veiled under threat of imprisonment and lashes, and cultural relativists say that it is their religion and must be respected.

* In Holland, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs states that Iran’s prisons are “satisfactory for third world standards," allowing the forcible return of asylum seekers.

Cultural relativism serves these crimes. It legitimizes and maintains savagery. It says that people’s rights are dependent on their nationality, religion, and culture. It says that the human rights of someone born in Iran, Iraq, or Afghanistan are different from those of someone born in the United States, Canada or Sweden.

Cultural relativists say Iranian society is Muslim, implying that people choose to live the way they are forced to. It's as if there are no differences in beliefs in Iran, no struggles, no communists, no socialists, and no freedom-lovers. If so, why have 150,000 people been executed for opposing the Islamic Republic of Iran? If it’s the entire society's culture and religion, why does the Islamic regime need such extensive tools for repression? If it’s people’s beliefs, why does the regime control their private lives - from their sexual activities, to what video they watch, to what music they listen to? If the entire society is Muslim, why did Zoleykhah Kadkhoda enter a voluntary sexual relationship for which she was buried in a ditch and stoned? If it is people's culture, why did the residents of Bukan revolt against the stoning and save her life? Why are thousands of women rounded up in the streets for “improper” veiling if its their culture and religion? How come, after two decades of terror and brutality, the universities are still not Islamic, according to an official of the regime? Though it's untrue, even if every person living in Iran had reactionary beliefs, it still wouldn’t be acceptable. If everyone believes in the superiority of their race, does that make it okay?

Cultural relativists say that we must respect people's culture and religion, however despicable. This is absurd and calls for the respect of savagery. Yes, human beings are worthy of respect but not all beliefs must be respected. If culture allows a woman to be mutilated and killed to save the family “honor,” it cannot be excused. In the Islamic Republic of Iran, religion rules and has become the mass murderer of people. If religion says that women who disobey should be beaten, that flogging is acceptable, and that women are deficient, it must be condemned and opposed...more:


http://www.maryamnamazie.com/articles/cultural_relativism_fascism.html

The Islamic indoctrination of hate against the West on a daily basis taught to impressionable school children as young as 7, the stoning, hanging, and maltreatment of women and dissidents in Iran is the most barberic and cruel form of totalitarianism. And if you think you and your family are immune from it, you're in for a rude awakening. As an one Iranian Poet puts it so eloquently, "A stifled female Always means a Defeated Male. A Defeated Male means the endangered world we live in now."

On the subject of democratic theoacracy:
As you might have recently watched Brian William's interview with Mr. Ahmadinejad, to my horror and disbelief, he and other journalists (Anderson Cooper, Mike Wallace) failed to ask the mini Shah Ahmadinejad how dare he can talk about referendum in Palestine as a means of deciding the future of the state of Israel and Palestinians in Palestine while in Iran people have been jailed or killed even at the suggestion of holding a referendum on Velayat Fagheeh(the absolute rule of Supreme Leader), the most anti democratic principal in Islamic republic or anywhere, which gives a blanket veto power to a single un-elected clergy over all elected officials.
A democratic velayte faghi (divine ruler, god’s agent on earth) is an oxymoron and more virulent than any non-religious totalitarian system. Grafting religion.

So far this year, the Islamic Republic has executed 10.10 person per day...

Please checkout amnesty international library on Iran:
http://web.amnesty.org/library/eng-irn/index

Holy Crimes of IRI Documented:
http://www.abfiran.org/english/memorial-browse-1.php

In conclusion, I strongly urge all liberals/jihadist to read about the history of Iran, specially 18th and 19th century Iran (e.g. Partial occupation of Iran by the Soviets during World War II) in order to get a complete picture of just how backward imbued with superstitions and medieval mentality we were as a nation (thanks to the akhunds (mullahs) and the Qajars) and how far the two Pahlavi kings (albeit not perfect) brought us in a mere 53 years. Our societal and political problems were not caused in these short 53 years. Their roots were long and deep. But the young people of the 1970's were tragically short on memory and long on idealism and unwarranted expectations. And today's generation of young Iranians pay a heavy price for it.

Anonymous said...

Wow, please forgive my typos. Too numerous to correct. That's what happens when your blood pressure goes up...LOL
Thanks for reading my rant.

Anonymous said...

Here are few other links I thought you might want to read reagrding cultural relativism.

http://www.iranian.com/Majedi/2006/October/Women/index.html

This article below particulary proves my point that Islamic culture a la mullahs is forced on Iranians as opposed to when the parents and grandparents of these children who grew up in a secular society:

http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1551049,00.html

On the history of Revolution and the power structure of the Islamic Republic and the brewing coup to oust the capitalist mullahs by Ahmadinejad and his military Junat, the IRGC:

http://www.iran-bulletin.org/Attack%20on%20Iran/WW%20article%20on%20Iran-MK.htm

I think that's enough info. for today.

Gracchi said...

Ok I've looked at your post and considered it thoroughly.

Firstly I never argued and if I give the impression that I would have would never argue that Iran is a good place to live- far from it it isn't but I do think it needs stressing that Iran has the institutional framework to develop as opposed to most of the other countries in the middle East. Apart from Turkey and Israel Iran is the only country in the Middle East to hold elections. I don't dispute human rights abuses- indeed I've signed some documents from Amnesty about that- but I'm sorry what I've just stated is a fact and tends to make me more hopeful about Iran than about say Syria.

Secondly as to your point about Mullahs- that is idiotic. I'm afraid that saying all of a set of people are the same is stupid and bad analysis. I'm no expert on Iran and I don't write much about it: but Khatami is not the same as Khamenei. They have different perspectives on the way that the middle East and Iran will develop and there are more people like that in Iranian politics who have furtherly different perspectives- I'm not saying I agree with Khatami but I prefer him to most other Iranian politicians. Furthermore I prefer him to most other Middle Eastern politicians (excluding Turkey and Isreal).

As to 1400 years of jockeying I'm afraid if you don't recognise how Iranian history has changed and not changed over the last 2000 years you'd be surprised. Persian monarchs are still used by many Iranian muslim theorists all the way through that period- and I'd remind you that as Muzaffar Allam's work shows much Persian literature in that period focused on other issues like toleration.

Oh I find the idea that Arafat dispatched the Iranians farcical too- I would remind you that Arafat was a secular nationalist- the PLO charter never mentions God whereas I don't think you think that Khomenei was a secular nationalist. Furthermore can I ask you why are you reading the works of a qualified psychologist about the middle East- there are plenty of good scholars- Fred Halliday, Patricia Cronin, Muzzaffar Allam are examples- working on the area so why a trained psychologist. You wouldn't trust a trained historian to diagnose your depression, why would you trust a trained psychologist to teach you abotu history.

Gracchi said...

By the way my comments in the Guardian are also to redress the balance- we tend to treat Iran like its the most evil dictatorship on earth but its not. It is evil. But its a partial democracy. And there are other evil dictatorships in the world Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, North Korea etc.

Anonymous said...

On Arafat: My friend's father owned a hotel in Iran where Araft and his goons brought 10 year old girls for Khomeini and the rest of the thugs. And I couldn't care less whether you believe me or not. After looking at the links on your site, I realized that you're politician and I should have looked at them before I commented.

You're obviously impervious to facts because you politicize people's sufferings. Enjoy your delusion.

Gracchi said...

Ok...

I apologise for enjoying people's suffering I never had and am interested in legitimate disagreement but if you want insults that's fine.

Umm... I'm not sure what else we can do here but thanks for commenting and I hope the suffering you are talking about ends.

As to Arafat- interesting I've never heard that before.

Anonymous said...

I did not mean to offend you in any way and I do apologize if I did.

Here is the website of the friend whose father owned the hotel. You can email him and he will give you all the details. He is in between LA and NY. He hasn't been updating his blog for a while...he must be very busy. His PhD dessertation is due in May so you may not get an immediate response. BTW, I'm a 'she' NOT a 'he'...and yes it does matter...LOL

The Arafat connection goes back to when Khomeini was being trained and nurtured by the Islamic brotherhood of Egypt. There are also pictures of Arafat and Khomeini when he was in Iran published by all major Newspapers in Iran. If I have time, I'll try to look for it.

http://amir.irani-tehrani.com/

Former Iranian President to be Charged with Torture

http://iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news.pl?l=en&y=2006&m=10&d=28&a=5

Gracchi said...

No sorry I was tetchy this morning and I apologise- I hope you see in my comment on the post this is linked to that I'm less tetchy now- I don't disagree with you that Iran is a hopeless country and suffering- its just better than some of the others around. You should get your own blog and write some of this stuff up and I will definitely link to you if you do- the Arafat stuff is fascinating because and I may be wrong I've always thought of the PLO as a sort of secular force obviously allied to the Islamic Fundamentalists but with secular allies too so establishing its religious nature or allies is interesting- I suppose as well it like Iran is committed to destablizing the Middle East- people like Hussein in the 60s were its enemies and would be Khomeinis too.

Anyway thanks for coming back- I hope I have offended you- I am more willing to learn than willing not to so I'll look at that website but in the morning- in the Uk its one now so I may take my time but thanks for coming back and when I'm wrong by all means correct me. Politics afterall is something I need to learn about as well as anything else.

Anonymous said...

Dear gracchi:

I had a blog for a short time and I kept receiving anonymous threatning comments. One had gone so far as to find out my IP address and that really spooked me because I still have relatives in Iran and the regime is known to have files on every single person outside and inside Iran... There are spies and informers in every neighborhood a la Stalin.

Here is the latest on Khatami, the smiling mullah:

http://www.iranian.com/Namazie/2006/October/Khatami/index.html

Gracchi said...

Ok well I'm sorry about that because your input is something that needs more exploration for people like me to find out about- can't access your article unfortunately there is some block on it but I'll try it again later. keep commenting then on this one.