January 02, 2008

The Children's Crusade and Media

I have written an over academic article over at the Liberal Conspiracy on the way that the Children's crusade worked and what it tells us about the way that we react to information. I think its interesting-noone else does which is why noone else has commented but I think it probably was too academic for that forum- and should have been posted here. So that's an encouragement to regular readers- get across and take a look! I think it also comes out as too postmodernist- I don't endorse the fully relativistic position on this!

4 comments:

Welshcakes Limoncello said...

It's a great article, Gracchi. I knew nothing about the Children's Crusade other than its name and I had a vague idea of when it happened so you have enlightened me, especially regarding its lessons for our times. Buon anno or did I already say that?

dreadnought said...

I know all about no one being interested! I have dedicated my blog to military history. The resultant readership is miniscule. Still, in a war of attrition you have to keep going.

Gracchi said...

Thanks guys- sometimes I feel like I'm shouting in a canyon with the echo booming around! Dreadnought I love your blog- its great and as for Welshcakes, I hate your blog every time I go there I feel hungry and want to eat some of that lovely food! :)

Ruthie said...

I'll bet a lot of people think it's interesting but have nothing intelligent to add... like me.

"The events of 1212 demonstrate that religious messages of conflict will not neccessarily be received by those who hear them in the ways that the speakers design. Whether its Papal attacks on Islam or Saudi attacks on America, the literate minded recipient of the information will most likely interpret it in their own way, no matter what a more politique leadership might suggest that they think about it. That means that whereas the specific ends of the policy from the Papacy or the Ulema is unimportant, its vocabulary is vital."

I never would have thought of that! It's an interesting parallel. (See? I can't be as erudite as you :)